Now in beta: DeltaE – a library for quantifying the difference between two colors

I have just published the first beta of my first public crate. DeltaE is a pure-Rust implementation of the International Commission on Illumination’s CIEDE2000 algorithm.

The goal of the algorithm is to put a number on the difference our eyes perceive when looking at two colours. If you’re interested in the details, then I recommend this rundown. In short though:

  • If the returned value is less than 1, then the human eye can’t distinguish between the two colours.
  • If the returned value is greater than 1, then we humans can see a difference when presented with the two colours.
  • The greater the return value, the more difference the human eye perceives.

This crate was written to be used in a project I’m currently tinkering with. It’ll come out of beta once I, and hopefully others, have used it some more and I have improved the test suite.

It is entirely based on Zachary Schuessler’s Javascript implementation of the algorithm. He is also the author of the aforementioned rundown so a huge thank you goes out to him for his work.

Jimmy Cuadra’s “The highs and lows of Rust”

Back in February 2016, Jimmy Cuadra wrote a post about “The highs and lows of Rust”. He too came to Rust from dynamic web-focused languages and he too “clicked” with it:

Rust has a reputation of having a much higher learning curve [than Go], which of course affects its popularity. I really haven’t been able to understand why, but somehow Rust just clicks with my mental model of programming […]

I’ve been wondering what helped make Rust click for me. The best answer I have come up with is that its basic function structure is relatively familiar to anyone who’s worked with Javascript. function becomes fn, and the parameter and return types are typed but other than that it’s more or less the same. I think that that familiarity with such a core and highly used part of the language helps a lot.

Read on, there’s more »

How to set up environment varying code in your Rust web app

There are times when you’ll want your app to run different code depending on which environment it’s in: development, production, etc.

For example: You provide your templating engine with a baseurl variable. In production, you want it to point to https://my-app.com, but in development you want it to point to http://localhost:8888.

We can accomplish this in Rust-y web apps with environment variables and the dotenv crate, as demonstrated in the following post.

Read on, there’s more »

Deleting the contents of a directory in Rust

There are various ways to delete the contents of a directory. You could, for example, delete the directory itself with fs::remove_dir_all and then create a new directory with the same name.

A more refined solution, which will go through the contents of a directory and delete each child without actually destroying and recreating the parent, looks like this:

use std::fs::{self, ReadDir};
use std::io::Error;

fn main() {
    let demo_dir = fs::read_dir("/path/to/dir");
    delete_dir_contents(demo_dir);
}

fn delete_dir_contents(read_dir_res: Result<ReadDir, Error>) {
    if let Ok(dir) = read_dir_res {
        for entry in dir {
            if let Ok(entry) = entry {
                let path = entry.path();

                if path.is_dir() {
                    fs::remove_dir_all(path).expect("Failed to remove a dir");
                } else {
                    fs::remove_file(path).expect("Failed to remove a file");
                }
            };
        }
    };
}

ReadDir provides an iterator over the contents of a directory. It’s worth noting that it’s a non-recursive iterator, which is why we’re using fs::remove_dir_all here. That standard function will delete a directory along with all of it’s contents, which avoids us having to recursively walk and delete. As I’m here, I’ll recommend the walkdir crate for all of your recursive walking needs though.

Note: In production, the delete_dir_contents function is the sort of thing you’d probably want to break out into a utils module.

Matching, saving and replacing text with the regex crate

Work continued on flyingV, one of my side-projects, last week. An interesting challenge I came up against was to find all of the matches to a particular regex across multiple files. For each match, I needed to save a specific portion of it then replace a specific portion of it with a new string.

The following uses the regex crate and is written in Rust. Captures are a feature of the regex language, not the regex crate itself though so if you aren’t familiar with them, there should still be something in this post for you.

To business then. The pattern I was matching against was any tera for loop containing quotes. Here’s an example loop I’d want to match:

{% for page in "20*/**/*" %}

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The building blocks of a healthy community

Over the course of my time on the internet I have been a part of many different communities, from the household names to the highly niche.

If one thing can be learnt from them it’s that building a community is hard; building a welcoming, helpful, ludicrously smart community is nigh-on impossible.

Building one such community is something Mozilla has managed to do with Rust however. My first month using the language and interacting with it’s community has set a new gold-standard in my eyes for what a healthy community looks like.

Read on, there’s more »